Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Lady bug Lady bug

Once again on my search for spring, I came across this lady bug last evening...

Did you know?????






Ladybug Ladybug Rhyme
Nursery Rhyme & History
Traditional Nursery Rhyme"Ladybug, ladybug" is chanted by children when a ladybug insect lands on their person. If the ladybug doesn't fly away of its own accord the child would gently blow it away chanting "Ladybug Ladybug fly away home". This insect is found every summer in the gardens of Britain - the most common colour is red with black spots, less common are the yellow variety. In Britain ladybugs are referred to as 'ladybirds'.Ladybird History Connection - Gunpowder Plot Conspirators?Farmers knew of the Ladybird's value in reducing the level of pests in their crops and it was traditional for them to cry out the rhyme before they burnt their fields following harvests ( this reduced the level of insects and pests) in deference to the helpful ladybird:
"Ladybird, ladybird fly away home,Your house is on fire and your children are gone"


The English word ladybird is a derivative of the Catholic term " Our Lady". There has been some speculation that this Nursery Rhyme originates from the time of the Great Fire of London in 1666 .

Ladybug Ladybug aka Ladybird Ladybird
Ladybug ladybug fly away home,Your house is on fire and your children are gone,All except one and that's little Ann,For she crept under the frying pan.

Ladybug Ladybug aka Ladybird Ladybird

I found this information here...http://www.rhymes.org.uk/ladybug_ladybug.htm

Don't you find this interesting?

Tell me.

Love,
Me

3 comments:

  1. So interesting! When our daughter was very small her nickname was 'Lady Bug'. As children we were always told that lady bugs were lucky and lucky was the one that a lady bug landed on.

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  2. WE SHOULD BE VERY LUCKY HERE IN PA. FOR WE HAVE LADY BUGS EVERYWHERE. THEY ARE REALLY BAD. EVERYONE IS SO TIRED OF THEM. I HAVE HAS A FEW ALL WINTER HERE AND THERE.

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  3. Yes, it is interesting. I would love to know exactly where it originated from.
    We have had them visiting us all winter. Coming in out of the cold, I guess.

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